“I Was Always Told I Dressed Weird”, This ‘Afro-Futuristic Hijabi Queen’ Teaches Us to Be True to Ourselves!

During my childhood, I grew up in an Islamic community. At the time, many Muslimahs hadn’t worn bright patterns and colors like they do now. You’d see a lot of women in black, brown, and navy.

I was always told I dressed weird. My outfits were policed even more as I grew older. They hadn’t understood that I used Fashion and makeup as a way differentiate myself and express my own individuality. I just hadn’t wanted to dress like the other girls.

Many of times if I had worn lipstick or color, I’d get funny looks. A few people even made comments to my face. And let me know that makeup wasn’t permissible or that all I was looking for was attention.

I did my best to incorporate my own style into the Islamic dress, but it still wasn’t enough. If I hadn’t wore what they thought I should wear then I wasn’t going to be accepted as enough.

I got so angry that I wore black lipstick to prayer as a way of saying: you will no longer police me. I wish y’all could’ve seen how big their eyes were. It was as if I was an alien amongst my own people.

What we choose to wear (or not wear) is personal.

So, here I am looking like a super weird Afro-Futuristic hijabi queen dripping in gold with, of course a black lippie!

During my childhood, I grew up in an Islamic community. At the time, many Muslimahs hadn’t worn bright patterns and colors like they do now. You’d see a lot of women in black, brown, and navy. I was always told I dressed weird. My outfits were policed even more as I grew older. They hadn’t understood that I used Fashion and makeup as a way differentiate myself and express my own individuality. I just hadn’t wanted to dress like the other girls. Many of times if I had worn lipstick or color, I’d get funny looks. A few people even made comments to my face. And let me know that makeup wasn’t permissible or that all I was looking for was attention. I did my best to incorporate my own style into the Islamic dress, but it still wasn’t enough. If I hadn’t wore what they thought I should wear then I wasn’t going to be accepted as enough. I got so angry that I wore black lipstick to prayer as a way of saying: you will no longer police me. I wish y’all could’ve seen how big their eyes were. It was as if I was an alien amongst my own people. I also remember when I was on Tinder and this guy swiped right just to tell me that I dressed weird. What we choose to wear (or not wear) is personal. So, here I am looking like a super weird Afro-Futuristic hijabi queen dripping in gold with of course a black lippie 😝 HIGH FASHION Darling. Has someone ever policed you hair style? Hijab (or non) style? Or makeup choice? How’d you clap back? Commence petty-ness. *Tongue pop* Photo: @jarrardraju #detroitblogger #psootd #plussize #instafashion #bodypositive #bgki #highfashion #honormycurves #effyourbeautystandards #pizzasisters4lyfe #blackgirlswhoblog #fashion #londonblogger #psfashion #detroit #blackgirlmagic #muslimgirl #editorial #plusmodel #feminist #wiw #intersectionalfeminism #turbanista #bodydysmorphia #fatacceptance #bodygoals #graffiti #eatingdisorderrecovery #selflove #afrofuturism

A post shared by Leah V (@lvernon2000) on

Leah V. is the fashionable creator of Beauty and the Muse and LeahVDaily (YouTube). She is an African-American Muslim living in Metro Detroit. She is a style blogger, wardrobe stylist, +Model, body positive/diversity activist, and novelist.

 

Photo credits: Jarrard Martin

Written by Mvslim

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