“I Was Always Told I Dressed Weird”, This ‘Afro-Futuristic Hijabi Queen’ Teaches Us to Be True to Ourselves!

During my childhood, I grew up in an Islamic community. At the time, many Muslimahs hadn’t worn bright patterns and colors like they do now. You’d see a lot of women in black, brown, and navy.

I was always told I dressed weird. My outfits were policed even more as I grew older. They hadn’t understood that I used Fashion and makeup as a way differentiate myself and express my own individuality. I just hadn’t wanted to dress like the other girls.

Many of times if I had worn lipstick or color, I’d get funny looks. A few people even made comments to my face. And let me know that makeup wasn’t permissible or that all I was looking for was attention.

I did my best to incorporate my own style into the Islamic dress, but it still wasn’t enough. If I hadn’t wore what they thought I should wear then I wasn’t going to be accepted as enough.

I got so angry that I wore black lipstick to prayer as a way of saying: you will no longer police me. I wish y’all could’ve seen how big their eyes were. It was as if I was an alien amongst my own people.

What we choose to wear (or not wear) is personal.

So, here I am looking like a super weird Afro-Futuristic hijabi queen dripping in gold with, of course a black lippie!

During my childhood, I grew up in an Islamic community. At the time, many Muslimahs hadn’t worn bright patterns and colors like they do now. You’d see a lot of women in black, brown, and navy. I was always told I dressed weird. My outfits were policed even more as I grew older. They hadn’t understood that I used Fashion and makeup as a way differentiate myself and express my own individuality. I just hadn’t wanted to dress like the other girls. Many of times if I had worn lipstick or color, I’d get funny looks. A few people even made comments to my face. And let me know that makeup wasn’t permissible or that all I was looking for was attention. I did my best to incorporate my own style into the Islamic dress, but it still wasn’t enough. If I hadn’t wore what they thought I should wear then I wasn’t going to be accepted as enough. I got so angry that I wore black lipstick to prayer as a way of saying: you will no longer police me. I wish y’all could’ve seen how big their eyes were. It was as if I was an alien amongst my own people. I also remember when I was on Tinder and this guy swiped right just to tell me that I dressed weird. What we choose to wear (or not wear) is personal. So, here I am looking like a super weird Afro-Futuristic hijabi queen dripping in gold with of course a black lippie 😝 HIGH FASHION Darling. Has someone ever policed you hair style? Hijab (or non) style? Or makeup choice? How’d you clap back? Commence petty-ness. *Tongue pop* Photo: @jarrardraju #detroitblogger #psootd #plussize #instafashion #bodypositive #bgki #highfashion #honormycurves #effyourbeautystandards #pizzasisters4lyfe #blackgirlswhoblog #fashion #londonblogger #psfashion #detroit #blackgirlmagic #muslimgirl #editorial #plusmodel #feminist #wiw #intersectionalfeminism #turbanista #bodydysmorphia #fatacceptance #bodygoals #graffiti #eatingdisorderrecovery #selflove #afrofuturism

A post shared by Leah V (@lvernon2000) on

Leah V. is the fashionable creator of Beauty and the Muse and LeahVDaily (YouTube). She is an African-American Muslim living in Metro Detroit. She is a style blogger, wardrobe stylist, +Model, body positive/diversity activist, and novelist.

 

Photo credits: Jarrard Martin

Written by Mvslim

Mvslim

In the mixed society we live today, we went looking for the ideal platform for Muslims. And of course, we didn’t find it. So we made one ourselves.

  • Rachel Haydon

    Article about a style maker, and only 1 picture? Come on…