Can We Talk About the Obsession with Marriage and Judging of Single People?

The number of unmarried Muslim women aged 27+ is fast growing and it is about time that we, as an ummah, start to give these women the recognition, support and respect they deserve instead of just derision, judgement and pity.

Times are not what they used to be. We live in a world where we are surrounded by choice: what to eat, what to wear, who to associate with and who not to. It’s only natural then that, with so much on offer, the marriage process has become trickier than it was 20 years ago, and now needs serious re-evaluation. We are still urging women to find a spouse and settle down using the old-fashioned mindset then criticise them when they do not get anywhere , calling them “picky” or “past it”.

How do I know this? It wasn’t so long since I was that woman: 30+, single, going on endless first dates, trying to find that ultimate connection that would mean I had finally found the elusive One. And it’s not like I “left it too late” as many women are told. I had been looking since I was in my 20s but faced rejection after rejection for the most ridiculous of reasons.

Like so many of our sisters I went on endless first dates, disappointed each time I met the guy only to find that the “spark” wasn’t there. Or other times, I was delighted to find the spark only to be told he didn’t want to pursue it further. And sometimes I’d find that connection only to have the guy just disappear without a trace, knowing most likely that he’d found someone better. Probably younger too.

Like so many of our sisters, I’d lie awake at night, stomach churning, wondering what I was doing wrong, questioning myself as a woman, finding dissatisfaction in my looks and other such perceived superficial flaws. I’d project into the future, seeing myself as a single “older woman” and desperately trying to make the lifestyle changes in my head just in case it happened. The other option was to “settle” which was too frightening to contemplate. I wondered whether I would ever find the one for me or whether the chance had indeed passed me by and I hadn’t noticed. I avoided anything to do with weddings be it weddings shows, Bollywood songs about weddings and often just weddings themselves!

I could never understand why others could do it so easily. I remember the gut wrenching feeling every time I received a wedding invitation from someone younger than me. I imagined them making wedding plans, surrounded by loving, crooning female relatives then later on after marriage travelling the world and making a flock of babies while I was still dragging myself out on those first dates trying to turn a coffee at Starbucks into something meaningful and full of potential.

But sadly this is not the end of the pain for our single sisters. Oh no, we then have to face your criticism and judgment. The way you ignore us when marriage proposals come up, favouring the younger girls in your circle instead. The way you look at us with a mixture of pity and scorn for being where we are and not yet married, as if it is some kind of exclusive club and we are still merely children for not yet being a part of it.

And let’s not forget the hierarchy of martyrdom! Yes single sisters reading this you know what I mean. When I used to speak to my married friends about the trials and tribulations of my life I’d be met with, “wait until you are married then you will know what stress is!”. As if being married takes you to the next level of the martyrdom game and gives you extra points. (Incidentally, now I am married I get the “wait until you have kids” trump card , but I am saving that rant for another post!).

But the assumption is that your life is somehow way easier because you have no husband or kids. Oh and you also have all the time in the world to do things at the drop of a hat for people and attend all of their social events because, as a single woman, you can’t possibly be doing anything else with all that luxurious free time you have right?

You may be thinking, well what about the guys over 30? Aren’t they going through the same thing? The answer is of course they too suffer from rejection and anxiety because they too want to settle. But the difference is they have much more choice than the sisters.

A guy aged 35 with a great job, a car and a place of his own is at the top of the bachelor pile and will often overlook you for a younger sister if that is what he wants. A woman aged 35 with a great job, a car and a place of her own unfortunately does not share the same prestige. She is treated with suspicion and ridicule and God forbid she should be looking anywhere other than her age group or older!

Most of our lives we were told to stay away from boys and were led to view them as something taboo and wrong. Then all of a sudden we were told to go out there and meet someone just like that. It’s like sending us up Mount Everest in flip flops!

The problem is we have never been equipped with the tools to make those decisions. In western culture, girls have boyfriends from a very young age and quickly learn the rules of love, often supported and guided by the parents. Our sisters instead are raised to succeed in education and employment, which is great, but we were never raised learning how to choose a spouse other than looking at a bunch of useless biodata facts, making a decision based on his height, age, education and income and hoping that the one coffee we have with him after work one day will seal the deal.

But because these are the only things we have ever been told to go by, we cling to them, never daring to widen our options for fear that we are deserting all that we know to be correct in the art of choosing a spouse.

We are so preoccupied with getting married now that we fail to remember that we are choosing a man who will journey with us into old age one day and hence we make decisions based on our current needs and lifestyles.

So why am I sharing all this with you today? Because I want us to recognise the pain and trials that our single sisters over a certain age have to endure and to show a little empathy and understanding towards their situation. Most of these women are dying to find that one guy who will be their companion, their best friend and their soulmate and your criticism of them will only destroy their self-esteem further.

It’s like telling a sick person to just “get better already” or telling a poor person to merely “get more money”. Next time you meet a sister who has been single a long time, ask her how she is feeling not whether she has met anyone yet, empathise with her pain even if you do not understand it and treat her like the smart, valued, worthy member of society.

Written by SorayaSingles

Helping single Muslim women worldwide go from single to engaged!
https://t.co/GOptlA3grT

  • Grad Student

    This in particular really resonated with me: “But the assumption is that your life is somehow way easier because you have no husband or kids. Oh and you also have all the time in the world to do things at the drop of a hat…” It seems a constant assumption that my time and labor are always available and that it is my duty to give freely because I am a single woman. It is exhausting, and it a bit dehumanizing.

  • UmAh

    While, as a whole, this article touches and articulated a great topic there is a sentiment here that is dangeorus and disingenuous. “n western culture, girls have boyfriends from a very young age and quickly learn the rules of love, often supported and guided by the parents.” This is not only a gross misinterpretation and generalization but it advocates for something that does not have any evidence to back it up. To assume that dating “at a young age” sets one up for success has no strong basis. Especially in a country where the divorce rate is reaching 50%. You can also go a step further and advocate for cohabitation to learn how to live with the opposite sex. Setting aside that it’s a strict prohiviproh in Islam, that itself comes with an increased risk of divorce. To the author, I suggest further data collecting rather than gross generalizations.

    If I had time, we can go further into how dating and subsequent breakups contribute to a whole host of other issues including the emptional effects. But for now, we can settle on that the grass is not always greener.

  • MashhadMagic

    Really interesting article, and I agree with (just about) every word.

    However, there is one important thing which is overlooked. And it’s something that might give a clue as to why men and women are struggling to find the right person to marry.

    “A guy aged 35 with a great job, a car and a place of his own is at the top of the bachelor pile and will often overlook you for a younger sister if that is what he wants. A woman aged 35 with a great job, a car and a place of her own unfortunately does not share the same prestige.”

    This is very sad, and while it’s by no means universal (I know several successful independent women who’ve gotten married in their mid 30s) there’s certainly an element of truth to it.

    But try changing a couple of words, and you’ll find the other side of the same coin:

    “A guy aged 35 (or 25, or 45) without a great job, a car and a place of his own is at the bottom of the bachelor pile and will often be overlooked for a more ‘successful’ brother. A woman aged 35 (or 25, or 45) without a great job, a car and a place of her own fortunately does not share the same problem.”

    I know no shortage of single Muslim women in average jobs still living with family who wouldn’t consider a man who’s not in a prestigious job, got his own place, and a decent car. I’m sure you know plenty too.

    And there’s a clue as to why people are getting married later. At age 25, very few guys will have those things (unless they’re living out of parental handouts). Marrying them is going to involve contributing equally, and leaving the comfort of the family home to rent while you both strive to save for your own place. It’s kind of understandable that the girls would rather wait it out for a guy with a house and a car to come along.

    Even at age 35, many decent hard-working guys are still going to be flat sharing and taking public transport. Some will still be doing so at age 45. After all, they can’t all be doctors, lawyers and business owners.

    This isn’t meant to be a battle of the sexes about who’s most hard done by. But the point is that, just as a lot of men are attracted by youth and beauty, and aren’t so bothered by career success, there are just as many women who only have eyes for the men who will be the best providers from day 1. They’re not attracted to youth or guys who are close to their families (ie living at home).

    Everybody acknowledges that it’s getting harder to marry, and the reasons behind it are manifold and complex. But for every brother who’s chasing younger women, I guarantee you there’s a sister with an eye on the guy with the sleekest Mercedes.